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SUPPLEMENT: ADDITIONAL READING AND SOURCE MATERIAL

ROBERT E. WALLACE, Compiler

To help the reader find avenues into the voluminous literature about the San Andreas fault system, the following selected references are grouped into four sets: (1) maps, (2) review and reference publications, (3) publications of historical interest, and (4) publications of general interest. Many of these selected references have been included because they themselves have extensive bibliographies. The references in section 3 are limited to those pre-1965, except for Hill's review (1981) on the history of concepts. The references in section 4 are directed especially toward the layman or specialists in disciplines other than earth science. These suggested additional readings should be available in most earth-science libraries or from the publisher; many can also be found in larger public libraries.

MAPS

Bond, K. R., and Zietz, Isidore, 1987, Composite magnetic anomaly

map of the conterminous United States: U.S. Geological Survey Geophysical Investigations Map GP-977, scale 1:2,500,000.

Dibblee, T.W., Jr., 1973, Regional geologic map of San Andreas

and related faults in Carrizo Plain, Temblor, Caliente, and La Panza Ranges and vicinity, California: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Geologic Investigations Map 1-757, 9 p., scale 1:125,000.

Drummond, K.J., chairman, 1981, Pacific Basin sheet of Plate-tectonic

map of the circum-Pacific region: Tulsa, Okla., American Association of Petroleum Geologists, scale 1:10,000,000.

Engdahl, E.R., and Rinehart, W.A., 1988, Seismicity map of

North America: Boulder, Colo., Geological Society of America: scale 1:5,000,000, 4 sheets.

Geological Society of America, 1987, Gravity anomaly map of

North America: Boulder, Colo., scale 1:5,000,000, 4 sheets.

1987, Magnetic anomaly map of North America:

Boulder, Colo., scale 1:5,000,000, 4 sheets.

Goter, S.K., 1988, Seismicity of California 1808-1987: U.S.

Geological Survey Open-File Report 88-286, scale 1:1,000,000.

Shaded relief map in color with earthquake epicenters in red.

Jennings, C.W., compiler, 1958-66, Geologic atlas of California:

Sacramento, California Division of Mines and Geology, scale 1:250,000, 27 sheets.

This atlas contains 27 geologic map sheets that together constitute the "Geologic Map of California" at a scale of 1:250,000. Information sheets accompany each geologic map. As of 1989, the map series is being brought up to date, and the Santa Rosa Regional Geologic map series 2A (1982, 5 sheets) and San Bernardino Regional Geologic map series 3A (1987, 5 sheets) have been completed.

compiler, 1975, Fault map of California with locations of volcanoes, thermal springs, and thermal wells: California Division of Mines and Geology Geologic Data Map 1, scale 1:750,000.

This is the principal map representation of faults in California on a single map sheet. It contains a wealth of information and is indispensable to anyone interested in the San Andreas fault. An updated edition is in preparation.

compiler, 1977, Geologic map of California: California Division of Mines and Geology Geologic Data Map 2, scale 1:750,000.

1985, An explanatory text to accompany the 1:750,000 scale fault and geologic maps of California: California Division of Mines and Geology Bulletin 201, 197 p.

A significant review of data. For example, plate 2 includes four maps: (1) structural provinces of California, (2) parallelism between major Quaternary faults, (3) relation of earthquake epicenters to faults, and (4) earthquake epicenters.

King, P.B., compiler, 1969, Tectonic map of North America:

Washington, U.S. Geological Survey, scale 1:5,000,000, 2 sheets.

King, P.B., and Beikman, N.M., compilers, 1974, Geologic map of the United States (exclusive of Alaska and Hawaii): Washington, U.S. Geological Survey, scale 1:2,500,000, 3 sheets.

Real, C.R., Toppozada, T.R., and Parke, D.L., 1978, Earthquake

epicenter map of California: California Division of Mines and Geology Map sheet 39, scale 1:1,000,000. A map and tabulation of earthquakes of magnitude 5 and greater, 1900-74.

Simpson, R.W., Hildenbrand, T.G., Godson, R.N., and Kane,

M.F., 1987, Digital colored Bouguer gravity, free-air gravity, station location, and terrain maps for the conterminous United States: U.S. Geological Survey Geophysical Investigations Map GP-953-B, scale 1:7,500,000, 2 sheets.

Simpson, R.W., Jachens, R. C., Saltus, R.W., and Blakely, R.J.,

1986, Isostatic residual gravity, topographic, and first-vertical-derivative gravity maps of the conterminous United States: U.S. Geological Survey Geophysical Investigations Map GP-975, scale 1:7,500,000, 2 sheets.

Stover, C.W., 1986, Seismicity map of the conterminous United

States and adjacent areas, 1975-1984: U.S. Geological Survey Geophysical Investigations Map GP-984, scale 1:5,000,000.

A standard reference depicting seismicity in the United States.

REVIEW AND REFERENCE PUBLICATIONS

Atwater, Tanya, 1970, Implications of plate tectonics for the

Cenozoic tectonic evolution of western North America: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 81, no. 12, p. 3513-3536.

Develops the concept of the Pacific system of plates converging with and underriding the North American plate.

Crowell, J.C., ed., 1975, San Andreas fault in southern

California: California Division of Mines and Geology Special Report 118, 272 p.

A guidebook containing 29 papers and a useful preliminary fault and geologic map of southern California at a scale of 1:750,000.

Dibblee, T.W., 1967, Areal geology of the western Mojave Desert,

California: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 522, 153 p.

Documents many of the bedrock features that characterize the San Andreas fault system.

Dickinson, W. R., and Grantz, Arthur, eds., 1968, Proceedings

of conference on geologic problems of San Andreas fault system: Stanford, Calif., Stanford University Publications in the Geological Sciences, v. 11, 374 p.

An important collection of 47 papers, representing the prevailing state of knowledge about the San Andreas fault system at the time of its publication.

Eaton, J.P., O'Neill, M.E., and Murdock, J.N., 1970, Aftershocks

of the 1966 Parkfield-Cholame, California, earthquake: A detailed study: Seismological Society of America Bulletin, v. 60, no. 4, p. 1151-1197.

Ernst, W.G., ed., 1981, The geotectonic development of California

(Rubey volume 1): Englewood Cliffs, N.J., Prentice-Hall, 706 p.

Possibly the best general review in one volume of the geologic and tectonics relations pertinent to the San Andreas fault system. More than 1,300 references listed in the back of the volume provide an invaluable source for further study.

Hart, E.W., Hirschfeld, S.E., and Schulz, S.S., eds., 1982,

Conference on Earthquake Hazards in the Eastern San Francisco Bay Area, Hayward, Calif., 1982, Proceedings: California Division of Mines and Geology Special Publication 62,447 p.

A collection of 61 papers in which the Hayward and Calaveras faults, and other smaller branches of the San Andreas fault system, receive considerable attention.

Ninze, W.J., Kane, M. F., O'Hara, N.W., Redford, M.S., Tanner,

James, and Weber, Christian, eds., 1985, The utility of regional gravity and magnetic anomaly maps: Tulsa, Okla., Society of Exploration Geophysicists, 454 p.

A set of 34 papers providing information and guidance on the use and interpretation of gravity and magnetic-anomaly data, as well as regional maps.

Kovach, R.L., and Nur, Amos, eds., 1973, Proceedings of the

conference on tectonic problems of the San Andreas fault system: Stanford, Calif., Stanford University Publications in the Geological Sciences, v. 13, 494 p.

An important collection of 53 papers, representing the prevailing state of knowledge about the San Andreas fault system at the time of its publication.

Oliver, H.W., 1980, Interpretation of the gravity map of California

and its continental margin: California Division of Mines and Geology Bulletin 205, 52 p.

A general reference and bibliographic source of gravity data.

Pakiser, L.C., Jr., and Mooney, W.D., eds., in press, Geophysical

framework of the continental United States: Geological Society of America Memoir 172.

A collection of 34 papers covering a broad range of subjects,

including stress, tectonics, regional summaries, and methods.

Ross, D.C., 1984, Possible correlations of basement rocks across

the San Andreas, San Gregorio-Hosgri and Rinconada-Reliz-King City faults, California: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1317, 37 p.

An insight into the longer term history of the San Andreas fault system as indicated by the disruption of older rocks. Scholl, D.W., Grantz, Arthur, and Vedder, J.G., eds. 1987, Geology

and resource potential of the continental margin of western North America and adjacent ocean basins-Beaufort Sea to Baja California (Earth Science Series, v. 6): Houston, Tex., Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources.

A major source volume about the continental margin of North America. Includes 33 chapters concerned with topics ranging from tectonic and basin evolution to hydrocarbon and metallic-mineral occurrence and potential.

Sharp, R.V., 1967, San Jacinto fault zone in the Peninsular

Ranges of southern California: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 78, no. 6, p. 705-729.

Stewart, J.H., and Crowell, J.C., in press, Strike-slip tectonics

in the Cordilleran region, western United States in Burchfiel, B.C., Libman, P.W., and Zoback, M.L., eds., The Cordilleran orogen: Boulder, Colo., Geological Society of America.

A review of strike-slip faults, including the San Andreas fault, in the Western United States.

Streitz, Robert, and Sherburne, R. W., eds., 1980, Studies of

the San Andreas fault zone in northern California: California Division of Mines and Geology Special Report 140, 187 p.

A valuable set of 16 papers on subjects including geology, geophysics, seismology, and engineering.

Sylvester, A.G., 1988, Strike-slip faults: Geological Society

of America Bulletin, v. 100, no. 11, p. 1666-1703.

An excellent review of the concept, recognition, mechanics, and behavior of strike-slipfaults, with numerous references to the San Andreas fault. Includes an extensive bibliography.

Ziony, J.I., ed., 1985, Evaluating earthquake hazards in the

Los Angeles region-an earth-science perspective: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1360, 505 p.

A valuable collection of 16 papers that review the state of the art about geologic hazards, ranging from predicting earthquake faulting and ground motion to landslides, tsunamis, and the use of earth-science information.

PUBLICATIONS OF HISTORICAL INTEREST

Allen, C.R., 1957, San Andreas fault in San Gorgonio Pass,

southern California: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 68, no. 3, p. 315-349.

Anderson, F.M., 1899, The Geology of Point Reyes peninsula:

Berkeley, University of California Publications, Department of Geology Bulletin, v. 2, no. 5, p. 119-153.

Bailey, E.N., Irwin, W.P., and Jones, D.L., 1964, Franciscan and

related rocks, and their significance in the geology of western California: California Division of Mines and Geology Bulletin 183, 177 p. A classic paper in which the San Andreas fault receives considerable attention and early tectonic models are presented.

Branner, J.C., 1906, An authoritative opinion: Mining and Scientific

Press, v. 92, p. 347.

Crowell, J.C., 1952, Probable large lateral displacement on

the San Gabriel fault, southern California: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 36, no. 10, p. 2026-2035.

1962, Displacement along the San Andreas fault,

California: Geological Society of America Special Paper 71, 59 p.

Documents large-scale strike slip on the San Andreas fault system.

Eaton, J.E., 1939, Geology and oil possibilities of Caliente

Range, Cuyama Valley and Carrizo Plain, California: California Journal of Mines and Geology, v. 35, no. 3, p. 255-274.

Suggests 25 miles of strike slip on the San Andreas fault.

Gilbert, G.K., 1907, The earthquake as a natural phenomenon,

in The San Francisco earthquake and fire of April 18, 1906, and their effects on structures and structural materials: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 324, p. 1-13.

This paper provided the first overview of the San Andreas fault in northern California. From Gilbert's field notes, he appears to have been the first to appreciate the true significance of the fault.

Hill, M.L., 1981, San Andreas fault: History of concepts: Geological

Society of America Bulletin, pt. 1, v. 92, no. 3, p. 112-131.

A review of the early development of concepts about the significance of the San Andreas fault, especially the amount of strike slip.

Hill, M.L., and Dibblee, T.W., Jr., 1953, San Andreas, Garlock,

and Big Pine faults, California: A study of the character, history, and tectonic significance of their displacements: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 64, no. 4, p. 443-458.

This classic paper was the first to provide data indicative of hundreds of miles of strike slip on the San Andreas fault.

Hill, R.T., 1928, Southern California geology and Los Angeles

earthquakes: Los Angeles, Southern California Academy of Sciences, 232 p.

Lawson, A.C., 1895, Sketch of the geology of the San Francisco

peninsula: U.S. Geological Survey Annual Report 15, p. 439-473.

First use of the name "San Andreas fault."

chairman, 1908, The California earthquake of April 18, 1906: Report of the State Earthquake Investigation Commission: Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication 87, 2 v.

This treatise on the 1906 earthquake contains an abundance of important data about the San Andreas fault.

Noble, L.F., 1926, The San Andreas rift and some other active

faults in the desert region of southeastern California: Carnegie Institution of Washington Year Book 25, p. 415-422.

1933, Excursion to the San Andreas fault and Cajon Pass: International Geological Congress, 16th, Washington, 1933, Guidebook 15, p. 10-21.

1954, The San Andreas fault zone from Soledad Pass to Cajon Pass, California, [pt] 5 off Structural features, chap. 4 of Jahns, R.N., ed., Geology of southern California: California Division of Mines Bulletin 170, v. 1, p. 37-48.

Oakeshott, G.B., 1959, The San Andreas fault in Marin and San

Mateo Counties, in Oakeshott, G.B., ed., San Francisco earthquakes of March 1957: California Division of Mines Special Report 57, 127 p.

Pack, R.W., 1920, The Sunset-Midway oil field, California, part

1, Geology and oil resources: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 116, 179 p.

Pack, R.W., and English, W.A., 1915, Geology and oil prospects

of Waltham, Priest, Bitterwater, and Peachtree Valleys, California: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 581, p. 119-160.

Reed, R.D., 1933, Geology of California: Tulsa, Okla., American

Association of Petroleum Geologists, 355 p.

1943, California's record in the geologic history of the world, in Geologic formations and economic development of the oil and gas fields of California: California Division of Mines Bulletin 118, p. 99-118. Does not mention strike slip on the San Andreas fault.

Reed, R.D., and Hollister, J.S., 1936, Structural evolution

of southern California: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 20, no. 12, p. 1529-1704.

Reid, N.F., 1910, The mechanics of the earthquake, v. 2 of

The California earthquake of April 18, 1906: Report of the State Earthquake Investigation Commission: Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication 87, 192 p.

Develops elastic-rebound theory.

Schuyler, J.D., 1896, Reservoirs for irrigation: U.S. Geological

Survey Annual Report 18, p. 617-740.

Steinbrugge, K.V., Zacher, E.G., Tocher, Don, Whitten, C.A.,

and Claire, C.N., 1960, Creep on the San Andreas fault: Seismological Society of America Bulletin, v. 50, no. 3, p. 389-415.

This paper was the first to report slow, continuous slip (creep) on the San Andreas fault.

Taliaferro, N.L., 1938, San Andreas fault in central California

[abs.]: Geological Society of America Proceedings, 1937, p. 254-255.

Concludes that horizontal slip on the San Andreas fault is less than a mile.

Vaughan, F.E., 1922, Geology of San Bernardino Mountains north

of San Gorgonio Pass: Berkeley, University of California Publications, Department of Geological Sciences Bulletin, v. 13, no. 9, p. 319-411.

Vickery, F.P., 1925, The structural dynamics of the Livermore

[California] region: Journal of Geology, v. 33, no. 6, p. 608-628.

Wallace, R.E., 1949, Structure of a portion of the San Andreas

rift in southern California: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 60, no. 4, p. 781-806.

Wilson, J.T., 1965, A new class of faults and their bearing on

continental drift: Nature, v. 207, no. 4995, p. 343-347.

Develops the concept of a transform fault.

Wood, N.O., and Buwalda, J.P., 1930, Horizontal displacement

along the San Andreas fault in Carrizo Plain, California [abs.]: Pan-American Geologist, v. 54, no. 1, p. 75.

PUBLICATIONS OF GENERAL INTEREST

Dewey, J.F., 1972, Plate tectonics: Scientific American, v.

226, no. 5, p. 56-68.

A brief introduction to the concepts of plate tectonics, including excellent diagrams of the geometry of the global plates.

Iacopi, Robert, 1971, Earthquake country: Menlo Park, Calif.,

Lane, 160 p.

A review and guidebook about the San Andreas fault, written for the layman, but includes useful maps and photographs of interest to the scientist and layman alike.

Jones, D.L., Cox, Allan, Coney, Peter, and Beck, Myrl, 1982,

The growth of western North America: Scientific American, v. 247, no. 5, p. 70-84.

Refines the concept of plate tectonics has been refined to include the accretion of smaller blocks to the main continental masses. The San Andreas fault system is involved with the motions of both larger and smaller plates.

Jordan, T.H., and Minster, J.B., 1988, Measuring crustal deformation

in the American West: Scientific American, v. 259, no. 2, p. 48-58.

Provides some ideas and data about how western North America is being deformed.

Schulz, S.S., and Wallace, R.E., 1987, The San Andreas fault:

Washington, U.S. Geological Survey, 17 p.

Pamphlet providing a brief review for the layman.

Wesson, R.L., and Wallace, R.E., 1985, Predicting the next

great earthquake in California: Scientific American, v. 252, no. 2, p. 35-43.

The science of earthquake prediction has been evolving, and the San Andreas fault system has been a target of major interest. This paper reviews some progress that has been made.